formula for change

As a human I have learned that change is the only constant and the most consistent agent we have in life. As Arthur Schopenhauer said, 'Change alone is eternal, perpetual, immortal.'  However, as a coach I have learned that people are not consistent in their goals or keeping up with their need/desire for change. In my observations, the struggle is whether we conform to the pressure around us or do we take center stage for the story of our life and determine for ourselves what change will look like?

‘When we are no longer able to change a situation – we are challenged to change ourselves.’ Viktor Frankl

Of course there are several stages for change, and most common are the personal stage and the organizational stage. Both seem to have their difficulties as well as alignments of skills. Regardless of the stage you set your foot on to live your change, the steps are similar, typical and exchangeable. Richard Beckhard and David Gleicher, later refined by Kathie Dannemiller coined the term, "Formula for Change" which is sometimes called Gleicher's Formula. This formula compares the success of change programs to the relative strengths affecting that change. It is as follows:
 

D x V x F x CL > R


There are four factors that are needed for change, whether for the individual or organization. These factors are:
Picture
  • D = Dissatisfaction with how things are currently;
  • V = Vision of what is possible and tangible;
  • F = First concrete steps that can be taken towards the vision;
  • CL = Creative Leadership to navigate toward the vision.

If the product of these four factors is greater than:
  • R = Resistance,

then change is foreseeable. D, V, and F are multipliers, because of that, if any one particular factor is missing or low then the product will be low and the resistance to change will be stronger. Whether the organization or individual, when trying to change 'Change Fatigue,' it is often felt in which people become demotivated, tired, and negative towards management (Williams, 2008).

What about CLCreative Leadership? For the organization, this could be a consultant, mentor, or other measures. For the individual, a coach would be best fitted. Regardless, in my honest opinion, something that is needed for expected change is an outside set of eyes because they provide:
  • Accountability - Someone to keep the coachee/organization grounded on progress and forward momentum.
  • Efficiency - Through accountability, solutions begin to unfold at a faster pace with the coach/consultant's efforts combined.
  • Expertise - The knowledge and wherewithal to know the direction.
  • Delivery - Knowing the right thing to say or ask and the timing of when to say or ask it.

The truth is, nobody knows the dissatisfaction more than those involved with the issue. Through this sort of influence and strategic thinking of the Creative Leader, the vision and concrete steps can be created. The benefit of this is permanent change. If the individuals involved can learn how to spot the interference they can keep positive momentum constant and maintain more constant progress.

Coaching Moment:
What needs changed in your life/organization? Do you have Creative Leadership trained to identify and navigate you through change so that change fatigue does not set in? Do you have a vision for what is possible and tangible? Do you have any sort of 'first steps' to begin your success?

Consider contacting me to discuss coaching or consulting to see your options and what is best for you.

Remember, 'All change is not growth, as all movement is not forward.' - Ellen Glasgow. 
The coach is an outside observer being able to see the whole arena and able to identify where things are colliding and are able to isolate the interference.


References
  • Beckhard, R 1969 Organization Development: Strategies and Models, Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA.
  • Dannemiller, K. D., and Jacobs, R. W. (1992). Changing the way organizations change: A revolution of common sense. The Journal Of Applied Behavioral Science, 28(4), 480-498.
  • Jacobs, R. W. (1994). Real-time strategic change: How to involve an entire organization in fast and far-reaching change. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler.
  • Wheatley, M. J., Tannebaum, R., Yardley, P. Y., and Quade, K. (2003). Organization development at work: conversations on the values, applications, and future of OD. San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons.




Leave a Reply.

    [get the blog delivered]
    * indicates required

    Archives

    October 2013
    August 2013
    November 2012
    August 2012
    January 2012
    November 2011
    July 2011
    June 2011
    April 2011
    March 2011
    February 2011
    January 2011
    December 2010
    July 2010
    June 2010
    April 2010
    March 2010
    January 2010
    October 2009
    July 2009
    April 2009
    March 2009
    February 2009

    Latest Tweets

    Picture
    Scan for Contact Info
    Picture

    Categories

    All
    American Financial Crisis
    Analyze
    Architecture
    Arizona
    Balance
    Cause
    Character
    Coaching
    Cold Marketing
    Crisis
    Criticism
    Culture
    Customer Satisfaction
    Decisions
    Delegation
    Ego
    Egoless
    Elephant
    Evangel University
    Facebook
    Focus
    Food
    Generations
    Goals
    Grad School
    Hansei
    Human Element
    Innovation
    Insight
    Instinct
    Irony
    Job Loss
    Kaizen
    Knowledge
    Landscaping
    Leadership
    Life
    Marketing
    Mediocrity
    Mol
    Money
    Monsoon
    Peace
    Permission Marketing
    Philosophy
    Plan B
    Praise
    Principle
    Principles
    Priorities
    Process
    Product
    Productivity
    Reframing
    Self Evaluation
    Self Evaluation
    Silence
    Smart Goals
    Social Networking
    Statistics
    Storm
    Strength
    Success
    Task Management
    Technology
    Value
    Values
    Vision
    Warm Marketing
    Weakness
    Weather

    View my profile on LinkedIn

×
contact me
×
meet me